Do Mormon believe in many Gods?

From questions by Ann Mere in comments on Sep 7th, 2010.

“Are there many gods? Are gods more holier than each other?”

This question requires some explanation beyond a simple “yes” or “no” answer, because both answers are correct and incorrect at the same time.

Mormons believe that every human being is a God in “embryo” form, or childlike form. Just as a boy becomes a man or a girl becomes a woman, we believe men and women become Gods and Goddesses. We believe the purpose of this life is to move us along that path, and that this life is one of multiple steps in that direction. Of course if this is what we believe, then yes, we believe there are multiple Gods. In fact, there must be billions, trillions, or even more Gods.

However, when we speak of worshiping God, we only speak of one God. Mormons believe in the commandment “You shall have no other gods before me”, but whereas those of other faiths think of “other gods” as being Baal or other gods that don’t really exist, or perhaps other “gods” in the sense that one can “worship” his career, fame, money, Blu-Ray, etc., Mormons believe all that plus the idea that there are in fact other gods, but only one God that we need to worry about. Or in other words, we only have one boss, one chief, one being that we worship and obey, and he is a specific person, separate from other gods. The other gods have no power over us, and we owe them no obeisance, no loyalty, etc. They are not in charge of us, responsible for us, nor do they appear to have any interaction with us, just as our God, theoretically, has no involvement with the children of those other Gods. In a sense, you might as well say there are no other Gods, because for all intents and purposes there aren’t. The only reason it’s even important for us to know that there are is because it tells us something about our own divine purpose.

Now, for the second question regarding whether one God can be “holier” than another God, the answer is more straightforward–no. Mormons believe that God is 100% perfect, omniscient, omnipotent, etc. There is no being more righteous, more knowledgeable, more powerful, etc. If there were, then it wouldn’t make much sense to do the bidding of the less powerful God, because the more powerful God could come along and turn all the first God’s plans upside down.

But this is kind of a weird part of the discussion, because there is and cannot be any such thing as a “less powerful” God, because by definition that person would not then be God. All Gods must, theoretically, be exactly equal in power if they all have 100% of whatever power can be attained.

To sum up, Mormons believe there are many Gods, but only believe in one God. Or to put it another way, Mormons know there are many Gods, but only know one God.

Comments

  1. No disrespect.. it is sad that the mormon church uses the name of Jesus as though they really believe that He is really the only son of God..That is not so.. I understand that they believe that He is among many..not the only one.. To really believe as a Christian, one must believe in a Triune God, that is a must..If you don't then you are practicing some other kind of religion.. THERE ARE THREE PERSONS IN ONE GOD, THE FATHER, SON AND HOLY SPIRIT…. JESUS WAS THE ONLY SON OF GOD, WITH A DIVINE NATURE, BUT ALSO POSSESED A HUMAN NATURE.,,,,, AND THAT IS THE END OF MY STORY!!!

  2. Mormons believe Jesus Christ is the only son of God in the flesh, but that we are all children, sons and daughters spiritually begotten, of God. If Christ is the only son of God, then how do you explain the following scriptures?

    Genesis 6:2 – That the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose.

    Job 1:6 – Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan came also among them.

    Job 38:7 – When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy?

    John 1:12 – But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name:

    Romans 8:19 – For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God.

    1 John 3:2 – Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.

    "To really believe as a Christian, one must believe in a Triune God, that is a must"

    Where does the Bible say this?

    • What do you mean in the Flesh?

      • We believe we are all spirit children of God. Jesus Christ is the firstborn spirit child of God. He is our older brother.

        On earth we’re all born in the flesh through mortal parents. Except for Jesus. His mother, Mary, was mortal, but the father of his body was God, and thus Jesus was half man, or mortal, and half God, or divine. Both the Father and the Son, immortal and mortal, Son of God and Son of Man. As such he was able to do things the rest of us never could, like live a sinless life and perform the needed sacrifice on behalf of our sins, which allows us to come back into God’s presence upon condition of repentance.

  3. Your question is how do you explain "sons of God" in the above versus? Simply it is the same meaning as children of God like you and me. It does not mean literal offspring sons of God as in Jesus in human form. The problem with Mormonism is that they always try to use the bible to interpret the meaning to what they believe. Mormons need to focus on who the founder of their religion is and his history then they would understand how ridiculous and demonic it is.

    • What proof do you have that the Mormon interpretation of Biblical scripture is incorrect?

    • What is demonic is you guys coming into this website and searching for trouble. Stop fighting and allow people to believe what they will according to the dictates of their own conscience. Mormons don’t go around finding fault in other religions, putting them down, neither did the Saviour. He was loving and kind toward all men. End of story. I’m Not responding or reading any responses either.

  4. What proof do you have that it is correct ? We have proof that Joaeph Smith was a liar and a con man .

    • Ray – As has been stated elsewhere on this site, the purpose of this website is not to convince anyone that Mormon doctrine is true, only to defend against claims that it is false. Therefore I make no effort to present evidence to convince anyone who believe these things are correct, but I do declare that neither you nor anyone else can prove that Joseph Smith was a con man, nor that Mormonism is false. As for Joseph lying, perhaps he did, but so did Abraham, so the question perhaps is not whether a lie discredits the liar, but whether the lie is justified or not.

  5. Ok, so if the book of Abraham was proven to be a fabrication with an incorrect interpretation of the Papyrus, then how can you believe anything in the book of mormon. The papyrus was proven to only be an ancient Egyptian prayer from one of their holy men, not writings from Abraham while he was in Egypt. And since we know that Joseph Smith is a false prophet and a liar, how can you believe anything in the book of the Mormon. In Galatians the first chapter, Paul states that even if an Angel from heaven brings your another gospel that what we have taught, then let him be accursed. So really??? You want people to believe that an angel moroni brought some gold tablets down to Smith, and then they were sent back to heaven??? Really?? Man, Christ and the Apostle Paul must be sad that people are falling to such false teachings. The Mormon teachings on hell are the true deception! Why would I even want to follow a righteous life, if I can live for the world now, and then be prayed outta some purgatory later, and still go to heaven. This cult is a lie directed by Satan and his angels to deceive many. Just like Jesus said in Mathew, many will come in His name, saying they are Christ. Very sad that many have been deceived by the mormon lie, which feeds on the carnal mind of understanding. In Proverbs it says do not lean on to your own understanding, but here is the good news, the Truth can set you free.

    • the two most common teachings of a cult are: 1.) Jesus was not God; 2.) Salvation is not by faith alone.  The two most well-known examples of cults are the Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons.  Both groups claim to be Christian, yet both deny the deity of Christ and salvation by faith alone.  While it may be true that Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons believe many things that are in agreement with or similar to what the Bible teaches, the Fact is they deny the deity of  Christ and preach a salvation by works qualifies them as a cult. 

      Just because you are passionate about your religion, doesnt mean it is right. God says that in the end time there will be many false prophets. Neither of you is right- three in one (is that schizophrenic) nor three separate beings. I am involved in an intense bible study right now, where I am reading the bible and using it as the only reference…maybe that is what God really wants us to do…think for ourselves.

      • When we hear the word “cult,” we often think of a group that worships Satan, sacrifices animals, or takes part in evil, bizarre, and pagan rituals.  
        However, in reality, most cults appear much more innocent.  
        The specific Christian definition of a cult is “a religious group that denies one or more of the fundamentals of biblical truth.”  
        In simpler terms, a cult is a group that teaches something that will cause a person to remain unsaved if he/she believes it.  
        As distinct from a religion, a cult is a group that claims to be part of the religion, yet denies essential truth(s) of that religion. 

        A Christian cult is a group that denies one or more of the fundamental truths of Christianity, while still claiming to be Christian.

  6. Forgive me for interrupting, however I really believe the one true god of the universe would insist that we love our fellow man and respect their individual beliefs as long as their heart is true and full of understanding for their brothers and sisters…friends & enemies alike. It is constantly argued that any religion (and there are many) is man-made and that very well be the case…however each of the hundreds of religions revolve around that one apex divine entity of goodness, love and faith to serve as an example of how we should live our short mortal lives on this earth in peace and harmony and not in continual conflict using God as an excuse for this conflict…I am not sure God would approve of any conflict in his name. Bottom line, it is the goodness and understanding in our hearts that matters not a human created institution poising as a shield for continual conflict. One belief is as precious & valuable as the next as long as it is for love and not hate.

  7. If you are not sure if God would approve of any conflict in his name, read the Bible, he has Jews fight for him on many occasions. Also if you know the truth then it is a sin of omission to desist from sharing it for any reason. The way you find the truth is to find EXACTLY what Christ taught, and what he set up to continue his teachings in perpetuity. You must find the one church that has existed from the beginning, has never swayed on any issue for over 2000 years and has never “split off” from another religion and is the oldest branch of Christianity. If you desire the truth, then I encourage you to look what Christ set up in his name and who he gave authority to lead. Look at the only church with an unbroken line of apostolic succession.

  8. Everywhere in The Bible that it says “sons of God”, it is exclusively referring to angels. later in the book of Genesis, it says “there were giants in those days”. The resulting offspring of “sons of God and the daughters of men”.

    • To be clear, I added as my opinion and the way I interpret it that they are the resulting offspring.

  9. I have a sincere question. If Mormons believe they are God’s to be, why did God get upset with Lucifer? He too wanted to be a God . We are trained and encouraged to be like God, so that wasn’t the problem. I’m so very curious. I mean no disrespect. Mormons are often amazing people, but I am sure you know people who are amazing, but deceived in their beliefs. No disrespect , I truly speak from a confused understanding of how that idea works with God.

    • Very simply put, Lucifer was only banished because his proposed method of carrying about God’s plan was different than what God had envisioned. Lucifer mentioned that he would force every soul to follow the commandments of God, and that the glory would be his own, whereas Jesus allowed everyone the right of free agency, and then atone for the sins of men, giving the glory to God. Because Lucifer was trying to deny us the right to learn through experiencing trials on our own and allow all of us to receive exaltation, it would then be impossible to determine who really is ready to be a God. I hope this answers your question :)

    • Deceived in their beliefs… 1 Cor 2: 14 “But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned”.

      Until someone receives the Holy Ghost, they will not be able to spiritually discern what the Bible is saying.

      And having a mormon lay hands on someone to receive the Holy Ghost wont work.
      When you recieve the Holy Ghost, the evidence will be speaking in tongues.

      Acts 19:6 “And when Paul had laid his hands upon them, the Holy Ghost came on them; and they spake with tongues, and prophesied.”

  10. Mormanism teaches an infinite regressions of God’s. But an infinite regression of gods means that there is no first God by which his subjects are exalted to godhead. If there is no first God how can there be a second and a third and thus there be the Mormon doctrine of Eternal progression?
    Another way of saying it is that Mormonism teaches an infinite regression of causes. Mormanism teaches that each God was made a God by a previous God which further means that as far back as you look into time this process has always been occurring. In other words, from an Infiniti of time past in the past, the Mormon plan of exaltation has been in effect. The only problem with this however, is that it is logically impossible. There cannot be an infinite regression of causes, ie., a god that exalted someone to godhead, who exulted someone to godhood, ad infinitum. This is logically impossible because you cannot cross and infinity.
    The truth is is that there is a single uncaused cause. Logic necessitates that there be a single being who is without beginning and upon which time has no meaning or affect who is the single uncaused cause. The Bible says that God is unchanging and that he has been God from eternity. This is exactly what logic necessitates is being true. The God of Christianity is not an exalted man from another planet with a goddess wife. The God of Christianity has always been God and has never been anything else.

  11. The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Days Saints is a Christian restorationist church that is considered to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus Christ, whereas God is conceived of as the Supreme Being as well as the creator and sustainer of the universe . In addiction, (1) Jesus Christ is the literal Son of God for His birth, life, death, and resurrection fulfilled the many prophecies contained in the scriptures concerning the coming of a Savior (https://www.mormon.org/faq/belief-in-jesus-christ). (2) Jesus Christ was both the Creator and our Savior, and He will be our Judge (see Isaiah 9:6, 53:3-7; Psalms 22:16-18). Basically, the Bible doesn’t teach that God created the Earth alone, instead, it claims that: “Then God said, ‘Let us make man in our image, in our likeness, and let them rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air, over the livestock, over all the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.’” Genesis 3:22 states, “And the LORD God said, ‘The man has now become like one of us.’”Therefore, we can check other passages in the Old Testament in which God refers to Himself using plural constructions. And in the same way, it is also interesting to note that Elohim, one of the primary titles of God in the Old Testament (occurring over 2,500 times), is in the plural form. Considering the following video released in you tube entittled “Dr. John Ankerberg – Do Mormons Believe in Many Gods?”, the guest forget to say that, among three gods, there is a Supreme one upon all! To sum up, it is easy to evidence that other videos and dozens of Internet texts are replete with disregard and insultings against any religion. So, we suggest that you can reflect on the following quotation: “Respect was invented to cover the empty place where love should be.” (Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina). At last, anyone who doesn’t respect other’s thoughts, culture or religion, is under gross hypocrisy and sunk into ignorance! Thus we have to examine carefully good sources of information if only we want to know a little more about God, Jesus Christ and The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Days Saints (https://www.mormon.org.br/). In a world full of religions and arrogant people, modesty and respect are even more required when we debate God issues. “Ignorance is the curse of God; knowledge is the wing wherewith we fly to heaven” (Shakespeare).

    • God, who at various times and in various ways spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets, has in these last days spoken to us by His Son, whom He has appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the worlds;
      Hebrews 1:1‭-‬2 NKJV

  12. When Mormons lead Catholics and others into accepting their doctrines, they begin with the familiar and move gradually to those areas that would be more difficult for prospective converts to accept. Over time, they attempt to show the non-Mormons various Bible passages which, they maintain, must be interpreted to support the Mormon belief in question. Many Catholics, inexperienced and uncomfortable with Scripture sleuthing, may reluctantly concede the point.

    Let’s see how this method could apply to the LDS teaching on the Godhead. This is purely academic since it is unlikely that a Mormon missionary would present the full doctrine of the Godhead to a potential convert. Such an unfamiliar teaching would be given to the person only after he had sealed his trustworthiness through conversion and prolonged fidelity.

    The LDS church officially believes that both God the Father and Jesus Christ appeared in bodily form to the farm boy Joseph Smith in upstate New York in 1820. From this supposed vision, Mormons conclude two things: God the Father has a physical body and there exists a plurality of gods. Their radical and irreconcilable opposition to the orthodox Catholic understanding of the nature of God may be seen in the Mormons’ interpretation of several biblical verses. I offer the authentic Catholic understanding for each of these texts misinterpreted by the LDS church.

    In Genesis 1:26–27 we read: “And God said, Let us make man in our image . . . So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.” (All references are given in the King James Version of the Bible, the only translation acceptable to Mormons.)

    So Mormons claim that, to know God’s image or appearance, simply look at man’s appearance. Since human beings are patterned on the Lord, to see the copy is to see the original. Therefore, God must have a body. He has arms and legs, a head with eyes, ears, nose, mouth, and tongue. In fact, he was once a mere man who worked his way to divinity.

    But the correct interpretation of “image” here refers not to any literal bodily correlation, but to the spiritual similarities shared by the Father with angels and men, his rational creatures. We are partakers in his nature in the sense that we share God’s communicable attributes: his moral and intellectual qualities, life, love, justice, holiness, truth, wisdom. By these, we may have spiritual fellowship with him.

    A further indication of God’s physicalness is found, Latter-day Saints think, in Exodus 33:11: “And the Lord spake unto Moses face to face, as a man speaketh unto his friend.” If Moses saw a face, then God has a real face, on a real body. But “face to face” is simply a Semitic term expressing an open and honest manner, the way one would, indeed, communicate with a trusted friend.

    Further, Mormonism argues, in various verses God the Father is spoken of as having arms, hands, eyes, mouth, ears, and feet. Put them all together and you get a body. But Mormons ignore the simple technique of anthropomorphism, describing the infinite, transcendent Lord in human terms.

    The ancient Hebrews correctly understood that the Creator had a “personality.” His omniscience was depicted as an all-seeing eye; his omnipotence was manifested in arms and hands of power; his omnipresence was signaled by his size and swiftness. He was given a mouth and lips so he could communicate with mankind. He possessed a mind that he could occasionally “change” and a heart from which flowed all the emotions known to man.

    Only in this imperfect and halting manner could the inspired writers hope to convey even a hint of the reality of a God who made, yet far transcended, things visible and invisible. References to the body parts and emotions of God the Father are purely figurative, poetic. After all, God is also portrayed as a consuming fire, a mother hen, and a rock.

    With these verses, the Mormon proselytizer has offered the Catholic a few well-chosen references from the Bible, expecting that these will be sufficient to loosen the Catholic’s hold on the spiritual character of God. An informed Catholic could disarm this weak attack on the orthodox understanding of the divine nature by referring to passages avoided by the Mormon exposition. For instance, Numbers 23:19 proclaims, “God is not a man that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent.” Hosea 11:9 is equally blunt: “I am God, and not man.

    Jesus Christ himself describes his Father in John 4:24: “God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.” And how do you define “spirit”? Listen to Christ in Luke 24:39: “A spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.”

    Catholics need to know from the outset that Mormons are, technically, polytheists. Their religion teaches that there are gods without number, though they are expected to worship only the god of this world, the one they call “heavenly Father.”

    Mormons say that God the Father is a separate and distinct personage and god; Jesus Christ and the Holy Ghost constitute two other separate and distinct personages and gods. These three gods make up “one Godhead” by virtue of their common purpose: They each want the same thing. Further, while these three gods rule this world and receive honor and obedience from earthly creatures, there are other worlds, each with its own god or gods who are as supreme in their spheres as our three gods are in ours.

    Mormonism looks to certain passages to support these doctrines. Recall that Genesis 1:26 stated, “And God said, Let us make man in our image.” Since “us” and “our” are plural, they reason, these pronouns must refer to more than one God. But the Hebrew word for God here is Elohim, which is a plural form. Correct grammar requires that the pronouns “us” and “our” also be plural, to correspond with their antecedent.

    While Elohim is plural, as are the pronouns used in his direct self-address, the rest of verses 26 and 27 is in the singular: “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him, male and female created he them.” What then are we to make of the plural Elohim? Several possibilities are reasonable. First, Elohim is a plural of majesty. The sacred writer places into the Lord’s mouth words of grandeur and awe, similar to the practice of earthly monarchs who refer to themselves as “we.” Second, God is addressing his heavenly courts, the angels, who had also been made in his image, having life, knowledge, virtue, and power. Third, the Father was addressing the Son and Holy Spirit. After all, the three Persons exist, dynamic and creative, from all eternity.

    Misunderstanding the Catholic teaching on the Blessed Trinity, Mormons love to point out the silliness of having but one Person or God taking on all three roles of divinity manifested at Christ’s baptism. How can one God be baptized, speak from the heavens, and descend like a dove, all simultaneously? But Catholics are not modalists, though confused Mormons consider them to be. Modalism is the heresy that states there is one God who manifests himself in different modes or expressions, sometimes as Father, or as Son, or as Spirit. One nature, one divine Person. In heaven, say Mormons, he is the Father. While incarnate upon the earth he was the Son. In his enduring influence throughout time he is the Holy Spirit. This is not the Trinity, but a facile avoidance of its profundity.

    The Trinity is the fundamental Christian belief. To comprehend it fully is beyond unaided human reason. We know, however, that the orthodox doctrine of one divine nature and three Persons in One God is firmly grounded in Scripture, believed from the earliest years of the Church, and defined by plenary councils. Though Mormon scholars shouldn’t be required to g.asp its depths any more surely than do their Catholic counterparts, it’s not unreasonable to expect them to do a minimal amount of research to discover at least the Catholic definition of the Trinity.

    If modalism were truly the most apt way of describing the Trinity, the Mormon critique would be justified. Indeed, we acknowledge the laughable scenario of a one-Personed God having to take on three separate roles in the baptism account. The same applies to the Mormons’ derision of what they take to be the Trinity in those cases when Jesus prays to the Father. They chide: “So he was praying to himself, since you Christians claim there is only one God?” No, Jesus Christ was praying to his Father, a distinct Person but not a separate God.

    Don’t expect to make much headway in clearing up the Mormon’s misunderstanding. The Latter-day Saint generally has the notion that the Christian God is remote, disinterested, theoretical, cold. The Mormon god, on the other hand, is warm and loving, approachable and knowable, someone you can hug because, well, he has arms to hug you back. It would be hard for the Mormon to trade his human god for the metaphysical abstraction their leaders have told him Catholics worship.

    Another favorite proof-text for the Mormon notion of many gods is found in 1 Corinthians 8:5: “For though there be those that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth (as there be gods many, and lords many).” It would appear that no less an authority than Paul taught the plurality of gods. But look at the context. The entire eighth chapter deals with the obligation of Christians not to give scandal to their weaker brothers in the faith. The Christians of Corinth, most of whom had converted from paganism, were faced with a practical dilemma. Most of the meat sold in the marketplace came from animals sacrificed to pagan gods or idols. Was it acceptable, Paul was asked, for a Christian to buy and eat this meat, knowing that it had pagan connections? In theory, yes, the apostle answered, since we know that other gods do not exist; they are “nothing in the world.” Besides, “there is none other God but one” (verse 4). He advised the Christians to consider the tender faith and scrupulous consciences of their weaker members. If these saw the stronger Christians buying meat offered to nonexistent gods, would their faith be offended? While the mature Christian knows that, though there are many entities that are merely called gods and lords, there is in fact only one God, the faith of weaker members should be protected from scandal.

    Mormons see a continuity between these beings. “As man now is, God once was. As God now is, man may become.” This Mormon motto sums up all that is wrong with both Latter-day Saint theology and anthropology. Mormons believe that the almighty god was once a human man residing on a planet similar to this one. He was born of human parents, learned to believe in and obey the Mormon way of life, died, and was resurrected. After this, his own god conferred divinity on him and allowed him to create and populate this universe. This process has been repeated into the infinite eternities of the past. The Lord confessed by Mormons is but one of untold millions of deities, each of whom progressed from a lower state—humanity—to the highest levels of godhood. But Latter-day Saints insist they believe in only one god, since they ignore all other gods but the (three) gods of this world.

    Eventually, the faithful Mormon can follow in the paths trekked by both God the Father and Jesus his Son. He, too, can become a god. Observance of the Mormon gospel, including its requirements of tithing, church work, and abstinence from coffee, tea, alcohol, and tobacco, can open the way to “eternal progression,” the deification of the faithful member. If found worthy, the resurrected Mormon man (with his wife or wives and family) will receive all the blessings and power currently experienced by God the Father. He’ll be god of a world of his own making. With his wives, he will populate that world with millions and billions of children, who in turn will worship and serve him. He will call forth prophets, inspire scriptures, and in time arrange for his children’s redemption, choosing one of them to be offered in sacrifice. But by obedience to his laws and to the Mormon church he will have established in his new world, those children may progress to their own places as gods. The process will continue forever.

    Basis for this belief is found in such verses as “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect” (Matt. 5:48). See, Mormons say, man can become as perfect as God! The child can become everything his father is. But this verse has nothing to do with eternal progression. The setting shows that we are called to perfection in the life of virtue. We are to grow into the likeness of God and his Son in such attributes as charity, chastity, humility, and fidelity. We are to become perfect humans, conformed to the image God intended when he created our first parents. When saved, we are to receive a fullness of all God has, though we will never be who he is.

    The current self-description of Mormonism is that of a (the) Christian Church, its members worshiping one eternal and perfect God, obeying his commandments, and striving to live holy lives. It is not correct to call Mormons polytheists if that means they divide their adoration and submission among several competing deities. It is equally wrong to call them monotheists, for they are, at the very least, active “tritheists,” seeing in the three divine Persons three separate gods. But more. They confess the existence of gods without number who, though uninvolved with our world and ignored by believing Latter-day Saints, enjoy a glory which surpasses that of their offspring, the “Heavenly Father,” the only god to whom the Mormon church relates. This god is neither unique nor supreme. He merely stands as one within an infinite line of gods before him and gods yet to be.

    Mormons truly love and obey the god they call Heavenly Father. Every prayer is addressed directly to him. Faithful Latter-day Saints say they experience his tender, ready care. In return, they are eager in his work, making enormous sacrifices of time, talent, and treasures to their church. What great energies are spent in service to this unbiblical god! Tens of thousands of missionaries preach him throughout the world. Hundreds of thousands (including many Catholics) are baptized in his name in hundreds of Mormon chapels each year. Over nine million members worship this limited, human god. Many of them strive to become gods themselves. If so narrow a Lord can inflame the ardor of so many, imagine the blaze Catholics could kindle by professing and living our faith in the only, true, and living God.

  13. While we don’t have a complete understanding of the concept of God than which none greater can be imagined, we understand it well enough to see that there does not exist such a being. A being that is greater than God that is.

    Is there anything greater than a whole? God is complete, which is to say you can’t add anything to God.

    Is there anything greater than perfection? God is perfect and does not lack.

    Is there anything greater than an omniscience being? God is omniscient, therefore there is nothing God does not comprehend nor can there exist another being who is greater.

    Is there a maximum greatness or is there something greater than maximum greatness? God is infinite, eternal and unchangeable.

    Is it possible to imagine something greater than a whole, perfection, omniscience or maximum greatness? No, these are God’s attributes. God’s very nature is all the above. God is the definition and source of all things possible.

    The Christian God is the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the End, the First and the Last. There are no other gods, Period.

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